It’s Often More Than Just That One Bad Egg…

It’s Often More Than Just That One Bad Egg…

It only takes one bad egg to put you off your omelette.

It only takes one bad prawn to put you off eating seafood.

But often there is more than one bad egg, or one bad prawn…

It’s the same in business. There will sometimes be bad eggs in business that can drag down the reputation of an industry.

And yet, there are some businesses that seem to just brush off adversity, as they go from bushfire to bushfire, from disaster to disaster.

How do these businesses survive?

How do industries of catastrophe keep going?

Are these industries so essential that they can carry on regardless of bad publicity?

What is it that makes the public forget some BAD NEWS over the course of time?

And yet other bad news becomes indelibly printed into the memories of all and sundry?

Will Trevor Chappell ever live down the notoriety of being the “underarm bowler”?

And what about Dr Walter Palmer DDS, the LION KILLING DENTIST?

What’s my point?

Your office, your business, your lifestyle all need to be reflective of the values of your world and your community.

You need to walk the walk and talk the talk.

It’s much easier to live a noble life.

You can’t ever be:

“DO AS I SAY, NOT DO AS I DO…”

Down here, Down Under, there’s a Royal Commission into some pretty horrendous behaviours by member organisations of the banking community.

Big member organisations.

And the fact is, that behaviours involving the ongoing billing of the bank accounts of dead people for insurance policies and the continued ongoing charging of people for services never provided are both pretty low acts.

And these are not one off behaviours.

More often than not, the first misdemeanours discovered by investigation are often the tip of some pretty offensive iceberg of behaviours.

I’m a firm believer in the fact that just like icebergs, there’s a lot going on below the surfaces and behind the scenes in a lot of places that we can’t see and are often horrified to find out about.

Sometimes the trails leading to the discovery of these behavioural patterns form a torrent leading investigators toward some fairly unsavory practices.

“GO DEEP” I say.

Leave no stone unturned.

Flush out the pathology.

Don’t dismiss findings as a once off…. there is often much much more….

*****

Make sure you subscribe to my monthly Dental Water Cooler Podcast Series…. “The Ultimate Patient Experience”

Click on this link for all details

*****

Have you read my book , How To Build The Dental Practice of Your Dreams [Without Killing Yourself!] In Less Than Sixty Days.

You can order your copy here: Click Link To Order

*****

The Ultimate Patient Experience is a simple to build complete Customer Service system in itself that I developed that allowed me to create an extraordinary dental office in an ordinary Sydney suburb. If you’d like to know more, ask me about my free special report.

Email me at david@theupe.com

Creating World Class Dental Hygiene Service In Your Dental Practice. Part V.

Creating World Class Dental Hygiene Service In Your Dental Practice. Part V.

Today I’m going to review the handover process that occurs in the hygiene room following the dentist’s examination for the dental hygiene patient who visits your dental office for their regular hygiene appointment.

This article is Part V of a weekly series of articles that explains the hygiene process that I used IN DETAIL to transform the hygiene visit for the regular loyal dental patient away from being considered to be “it’s only a clean”.

This regularly scheduled visit must ALWAYS  be an ULTIMATE PATIENT EXPERIENCE each and every time.

Four weeks ago I discussed the important role that a dental hygienist plays in the creation of an EXPERIENCE for their patient so that the hygiene visit for the regular loyal dental patient is not simply “just a cleaning”.

In that article I wrote about the important role that the dental hygienist plays at the beginning of every patient’s hygiene appointment. I discussed the important role of Emily the hygienist in creating a perfect platform at the start of the patient’s hygiene appointment, truly “setting the stage” for the remainder of the visit to be a World Class Experience.

Then three weeks ago I wrote about the level of trust that gets established between the hygienist and the patient during the first forty minutes of the hygiene appointment, and how with that, the time taken by the dentist to do the examination and explain treatment inside the hygiene room is significantly less than when the hygienist takes no part in any uncovering and discovery of areas of concern prior to the arrival of the dentist.

Two weeks ago I wrote about the best way for the dentist to be alerted about the hygiene exam, and how to turn that notification into a systematic, structured and discrete internal advertisement for your dental practice and your world class customer service systems.

Last week I took a look in detail at the examination process for the dental hygiene patient who visits your dental office for their regular hygiene appointment, transforming that process into an ULTIMATE PATIENT EXPERIENCE each and every time.

The Dental Hygiene Room Handover

Following the completion of the dental examination, the dentist must now HAND OVER  the hygiene patient back to the dental hygienist and then depart from the hygiene room and return to his restorative patient.

This process needs to be systematized and choreographed correctly to have maximum positive effect on the hygiene patient so that they move forward with their next visit with certainty.

This is regardless of whether that next visit is for restorative dentistry or for another hygiene visit.

The purpose of the handover is to create a result of clarity for the patient as to what their next step must be.

A poor handover creates confusion and uncertainty within the mind of the patient.

A perfect handover has the patient enthused and excited about their next visit.

Here’s what needs to happen:

At the completion of examination the Dentist initiates the return of the dental chair to the vertical and he rises to come and stand in front of the Patient as they re-orientate themselves after having been reclined.

It’s at this point that the Doctor then clearly hands the patient back over to the Dental Hygienist in readiness for the patient’s transfer from the Hygiene Room to the Front Office.

It is important and imperative that at this stage the Dentist informs the patient, and the Dental Hygienist, the following key pieces of information.

It is also imperative that both the patient and the Dental Hygienist truly grasp and understand fully the Dentist’s clear and thorough instructions and explanations.

Here are the five things that the Dentist must tell the patient when he hands over the patient to the Dental Hygienist at the completion of their dental hygiene examination. 

  1. Exactly what the dentist did today.The dentist must let the patient know that the examination is now complete.
  2. The Big Picture.The Dentist needs to let the patient know the result of the examination. Not so much a blow by blow, tooth by tooth, and surface by surface description of what is wrong and what needs to be done. I always found that ball park numbers were appropriate at this time.
  3. Exactly what treatment the Patient will be having at their next visit to the Dental Office.It is the dentist’s responsibility to let the patient and the hygienist know exactly what treatment  the patient
     will be having at their next visit to the dental office.

  4. The time frame or urgency of the remaining treatment required.It is the Dentist’s duty to inform the Patient when exactly he next wants to see the patient.The Dentist’s role here is to create urgency for the treatment as opposed to creating a *Lack of Urgency* in the Patient’s mind. Creating urgency assists the Dental Hygienist and the Front Office team members in securing the next appointment for the Patient.
  5. Exactly what will happen if the next treatment is not carried out.The Dentist must inform the patient of the consequences if treatment is not carried out. The patient must understand that taking action is imperative for them.

Along with this, the Dentist must ensure that both the patient and the Dental Hygienist have a clear understanding of exactly what he has just said.

The Dentist needs to also:

  1. Look the patient in the eye, and thank them sincerely for their time.
  2. Compliment the patient on being such a great patient for you today.Everybody loves recognition.
  3. Farewell the patient with sincere wishes of best wishes and good health.
  4. Recognise or re-recognise any significant event coming up for the patient that will occur before their next visit.This may be something that the patient has discussed with the Dentist already. Or it may be some information the patient has shared with the hygienist or with another team member that has been acquired by the Dentist via Secret Service Systems [information passed to the Dentist with the specific purpose of creating a *WOW* factor for the patient].
  5. Look to create any Above and Beyond Experiences for the patient.If the patient has mentioned something personal, the Dentist may have an opportunity to provide an article or small gift that may be appropriate in that situation.

These last five points are extremely important and crucial in differentiating your dentist and your Dental Office as being truly different from every other Dental Practice around because no other Office around is taking the time to treat every patient as a friend, or as a person and not just as a number or an item on a conveyor belt.

Because most dentists don’t do this!

Most dental offices have the dentist come in to do the examination when it suits the dentist, and subsequently there is no handover.

I’ve even seen dental offices where the hygienist has moved on to their next patient and the dentist walks in to do the examination cold, on a lukewarm patient.

[What could possibly go wrong there?]

When you systematise and choreograph the hygiene visit in the way I have outlined, you will see a dramatic increase in the number of patients booking AND KEEPING their next appointments.

It’s all about creating clarity for the patient.

CLEAR. NEXT. STEP.

Patients who are clear on what needs to be done will make and keep appointments.

patients who are unclear will make fewer appointments and cancel them more often.

Next week we will close off this series of articles when I discuss the Ultimate Post-Appointment Process for the departing hygiene patient and how it acts to reinforce the hygiene visit as a truly World Class Customer Service Experience.

*****

Make sure you subscribe to my monthly Dental Water Cooler Podcast Series…. “The Ultimate Patient Experience”

Click on this link for all details

*****

Have you read my book , How To Build The Dental Practice of Your Dreams [Without Killing Yourself!] In Less Than Sixty Days.

You can order your copy here: Click Link To Order

*****

The Ultimate Patient Experience is a simple to build complete Customer Service system in itself that I developed that allowed me to create an extraordinary dental office in an ordinary Sydney suburb. If you’d like to know more, ask me about my free special report.

Email me at david@theupe.com

How To Not Go Out Of Business 101.

How To Not Go Out Of Business 101.

One of the best pieces of advice I was ever given was from a medical doctor who told me:

The Purpose of an Appointment is to Make Another Appointment.

This statement is profoundly correct.

If you want to stay in business you either need lots of new business or you need to create repeat business.

And if you want to create repeat business you need to create a compelling reason for that customer to re-engage with you and your business.

The hedge trimmer.

Have you ever marveled at those perfectly shaped and manicured English-styled Leightons Green hedges, and how well maintained they look?

The reason for that is because of the regularity with which those hedges are trimmed.

These hedges are trimmed regularly and routinely. They are not allowed to grow wild and out of control. If they grow out of control without regular tip pruning, then any subsequent pruning will result in a woody appearance. 

Putting it simply, to maintain their excellent appearance, they need to have regularly scheduled attention. 

They do not look nearly as good if they are allowed to grow to an “out of hand” condition and are then stripped back to a woody framework.

The hedge trimmer who has a bevy of regular clients who he services on a pre-arranged systematic basis will always have a more successful business to own, and keep, or sell, than the hedge trimmer who only provides services to clients who call when those clients feel like it is time for a visit.

Do you see the difference?

The business that gives its customers a reason for additional or continuous business will always be more secure and more successful than a business that does not and sits there and waits for the phone to ring.

The Medical Doctor.

The medical doctor who asks patients to return to review their condition and re-evaluate their health will be twice as busy as the medico who farewells his patients with a simple:

“Call me if that hasn’t resolved and is still bothering you…”

Are the medical patients receiving better care because of the follow on appointment being scheduled?

You bet they are, that’s for sure.

But its more than just the extra appointment…..

It’s really about your business showing that it cares about the wellbeing of its customers.

It’s about building relationship with your customers.

The more times you see your customers, the more times you have an opportunity to add to your relationship with them.

The more you see them, the more they will get to know you and like you and like what you do for them.

The less often you see your customers the more opportunity you give them to forget you and forget who you are and forget what a great job you do for them.

If you don’t value your customers they will leave you.

Give them time. Give them service. Anticipate their needs. Alert them to those things that have them valuing what you do for them.

The more times you see your customers the more opportunities you have to make them feel welcome, comfortable, important, and understood.

Don’t ever take time spent for granted.

Time spent with customers is a valuable investment.

*****

Make sure you subscribe to my monthly Dental Water Cooler Podcast Series…. “The Ultimate Patient Experience”

Click on this link for all details

*****

Have you read my book , How To Build The Dental Practice of Your Dreams [Without Killing Yourself!] In Less Than Sixty Days.

You can order your copy here: Click Link To Order

*****

The Ultimate Patient Experience is a simple to build complete Customer Service system in itself that I developed that allowed me to create an extraordinary dental office in an ordinary Sydney suburb. If you’d like to know more, ask me about my free special report.

Email me at david@theupe.com

Creating World Class Dental Hygiene Service In Your Dental Practice. Part IV.

Creating World Class Dental Hygiene Service In Your Dental Practice. Part IV.

Today it’s time to look at the examination process for the dental hygiene patient who visits your dental office for their regular hygiene appointment.

This article is Part IV of a weekly series of articles that explains the hygiene process that I used IN DETAIL to transform the hygiene visit for the regular loyal dental patient away from being considered to be “just another cleaning”.

This regularly scheduled visit truly can be an ULTIMATE PATIENT EXPERIENCE each and every time.

Three weeks ago I discussed the important role that a dental hygienist plays in the creation of an EXPERIENCE for their patient so that the hygiene visit for the regular loyal dental patient is not simply “only a clean”.

In that article we discussed the important role that the dental hygienist plays at the beginning of every patient’s hygiene appointment. We looked at the important role of Emily the hygienist in creating a perfect platform at the start of Mrs Smith’s hygiene appointment, truly “setting the stage” for the remainder of the visit to be a World Class Experience.

Then two weeks ago I discussed the level of trust established between the hygienist and the patient already during the first forty minutes of the hygiene appointment, and how with that, the time taken by the dentist to do the examination and explain treatment inside the hygiene room was significantly less than when the hygienist took no part in any uncovering and discovery of areas of concern prior to the arrival of the dentist.

Last week I wrote about the best way for the dentist to be alerted about the hygiene exam, and how to turn that notification into a systematic, structured and discrete internal advertisement for your dental practice and your world class customer service systems.

The Dental Examination.

The dentist arrives into the hygiene room.

The purpose of the dentist’s visit to the hygiene room is to examine the patient and review the findings of the hygienist, as well as to discuss all areas of concern that the patient may have raised.

When the dentist arrives in the room, it is always at the designated time that the practice has predetermined, and it is always AFTER the time that the hygienist has gone to notify the dentist that he is now required.

The dentist DOES NOT EVER arrive unannounced.

The visit of the patient for their regular hygiene appointment is structured to provide MAXIMUM experience for the patient.

The appointment chronology is organised so that the hygiene patient never feels as though they are an appendage to the dentist’s day.

The regular hygiene patient must always be made to feel as though they are the ONLY appointment that matters on that day.

So here’s what happens:

The dentist enters the room and is greeted by the hygienist and his arrival is announced to the patient.

The dentist thanks the hygienist, and greets the patient.

The hygienist then updates the dentist about any social topic that she has been discussing with the patient. This could include any recent travel, any family events, or any work related stories that they have been discussing.

The dentist then joins into that social conversation with the patient, as the hygienist [aurally] removes herself from that conversation.

At the appropriate time, the dentist decides that it is time to perform the patient’s dental examination.

As the dentist assumes the examination position and adjusts the chair, he asks the hygienist:

“So Emily, are there any areas that you would like me to look at?”

The hygienist then replies:

“Dr Moffet, I’d like you to take a look at [this area]”, 

and then goes into detail about her findings and observations.

During this process of discussing this first area of concern, the hygienist will also present to the dentist any relevant images and radiographs that she has taken.

The hygienist also lets the dentist know of any treatment options that she has discussed with the patient.

These initial area[s] that the hygienist raises with the dentist are major areas of concern discovered by the hygienist, along with any areas that the patient has raised already with the hygienist.

It is important that the patient feels that these areas of concern are being conveyed to the dentist BEFORE the dentist begins the regular dental examination process, as opposed to being raised DURING the examination itself.

By doing this, the dentist and the hygienist HEIGHTEN the urgency and relevance of these primary areas.

Once these areas have all been discussed and treatment planned, the dentist and the hygienist then continue with the examination process.

In my office, this process involved the hygienist describing EACH individual tooth and its condition, one at a time, beginning with the Upper Right Third Molar and finishing with the Lower Right Third Molar.

Each tooth is mentioned as to its presence, its restorative status, and whether there is any pathology [or perceived pathology] present that the dentist needs to review.

By doing the examination in this way the importance of the hygienist in the process is raised and elevated in the patient’s eyes.

The patient now sees the hygienist now as an important pre-diagnostician, and not simply as “the girl who cleans my teeth.”

When done correctly, this examination process can be an efficient time saver for the dentist because his examination then becomes a matter of “review” as opposed to “discovery”.

The dentist’s role is to review all of the findings of the hygienist and to finalise the correct treatment path for the patient.

Following the completion of the oral examination by the dentist, the hygienist then clarifies with the dentist which area exactly the dentist is going to start treating first, and the time frame is clarified as to when exactly as well.

The dentist explains to the patient what is being done next, and when, and whether he wants the patient to be seen sooner, should anything become available.

The dentist also informs the patient exactly what will happen if this first treatment is delayed and not carried out in the recommended time frame.

Next week I’ll be discussing the farewelling of the patient by the dentist, and the subsequent completion of the hygiene appointment process by the hygienist and the front of office team members.

Remember, that during all of this process, the patient is always feeling care and attention from the dental hygienist, the dentist, and the whole office team.

The regular hygiene patient must always be made to feel that they are the MOST important client of the day.

*****

Make sure you subscribe to my monthly Dental Water Cooler Podcast Series…. “The Ultimate Patient Experience”

Click on this link for all details

*****

Have you read my book , How To Build The Dental Practice of Your Dreams [Without Killing Yourself!] In Less Than Sixty Days.

You can order your copy here: Click Link To Order

*****

The Ultimate Patient Experience is a simple to build complete Customer Service system in itself that I developed that allowed me to create an extraordinary dental office in an ordinary Sydney suburb. If you’d like to know more, ask me about my free special report.

Email me at david@theupe.com

How’s Your Induction Process?

How’s Your Induction Process?

Recently a good friend of mine decided upon a change in career.

It was a big decision.

Having previously carved out significant careers in hospitality and also in food technology and sports nutrition, my friend decided on the challenge of a new role in an area that she had previously not worked in.

She had applied for a job in “retail”.

And she was one of the successful applicants.

And so began the induction…

The thing that surprised me about the induction process that this organisation used for new employees was that acceptance to the role required some SIGNIFICANT pre-employment training.

Pre-employment training? That’s fairly normal, you would think?

Well, as I said, this role involved some SIGNIFICANT pre-employment training.

The pre-employment training involved a four-week educational process followed by a two-week on the job training “live” before applicants were then allocated a position within the retail organisation.

So I asked myself, what could be so difficult about training for retail?

After all, it’s not life or death.

Well that’s what I thought….

Really, how much harder could a retail induction be compared to an induction to work as a dental assistant or to work as a dental front office receptionist?

Well, let me tell you this:

The training manual that my friend received was a two-ring binder with three inches thickness of pages.

Within said binder were more than ten modules of education that my friend was required to learn and to master in order to complete her PRE-employment training.

As an example of the attention to detail of this organisation, here are just five of the many topics that my friend was required to learn and master in order to complete her pre-employment onboarding process:

  • Greet customers in a polite and friendly manner within designated response times and make them a priority over other workplace duties.
  • Show interest in customer’s needs and maintain a welcoming customer environment free of complacency.
  • Selling to the customer by establishing customer needs, providing advice on any product or service, and facilitating the sale.
  • Use questioning and active listening to facilitate effective two-way communication.
  • Take opportunities to up-sell and cross-sell products and services that enhance customer request and maximise profitability of sale.

I found the attention to detail within this strict onboarding process to be quite extraordinary.

For a retail position, where I thought the staff attitude would be simply “you’re in our store because you have a NEED”, my feeling is that we have certainly come a long way, in terms of the impressions given by this organisation.

My observation is this:

In dentistry, sadly, the onboarding process is often as hurried and as brief as:

“You’ve answered the phone, there’s the phone, go answer it….”

A heck of a lot of the time.

Can we do better when hiring?

We need to live by the edict:

“Hire slow and fire fast.”

If we do not, other industries are going to pass us by….

*****

Make sure you subscribe to my monthly Dental Water Cooler Podcast Series…. “The Ultimate Patient Experience”

Click on this link for all details

*****

Have you read my book , How To Build The Dental Practice of Your Dreams [Without Killing Yourself!] In Less Than Sixty Days.

You can order your copy here: Click Link To Order

*****

The Ultimate Patient Experience is a simple to build complete Customer Service system in itself that I developed that allowed me to create an extraordinary dental office in an ordinary Sydney suburb. If you’d like to know more, ask me about my free special report.

Email me at david@theupe.com

Creating World Class Dental Hygiene Service In Your Dental Practice. Part III.

Creating World Class Dental Hygiene Service In Your Dental Practice. Part III.

Two weeks ago I discussed the important role that a dental hygienist plays in the creation of an EXPERIENCE for their patient so that the hygiene visit for the regular loyal dental patient is not simply “just another cleaning” or “it’s only a clean”.

This regularly scheduled visit truly can be an ULTIMATE PATIENT EXPERIENCE each and every time.

In that article we discussed the important role that the dental hygienist plays at the beginning of every patient’s hygiene appointment. We looked at the important role of Emily the hygienist in creating a perfect platform at the start of Mrs Smith’s hygiene appointment, truly “setting the stage” for the remainder of the visit to be a World Class Experience.

Then last week I discussed the level of trust established between the hygienist and the patient already during the first forty minutes of the hygiene appointment, and how with that, the time taken by the dentist to do the examination and explain treatment inside the hygiene room was significantly less than when the hygienist took no part in any uncovering and discovery of areas of concern prior to the arrival of the dentist.

The other major thing we found by doing hygiene exams this way was that the amount of diagnosed restorative treatment coming from the hygiene rooms that was explained and proposed, and subsequently scheduled and completed, was significantly more in each of those four categories, than when the dentist played the role of SOLO DIAGNOSTICIAN arriving when and where he felt like it.

Interesting…..

How Does The Hygienist Notify The Dentist?

The hygienist must go and notify the dentist IN PERSON that she is ready for him to come and do the examination on her hygiene patient.

“Can’t she just BUZZ him?”

No.

The replacement of *maximum* human interaction by any form of automation or diminished human participation seriously detracts from the derived benefit the office gains in creating an inviting environment of caring coworkers behaving warmly and lovingly towards each other and towards their patients and towards their duties and roles within the office.

The entry of the hygienist to the dentist’s treatment room, when done correctly, acts as an advertisement for the hygiene department, and also acts as an advertisement for the wonderful personality of the hygienist. 

It allows the dentist to excuse himself from the treated patient and “introduce” the hygienist’s service, as he leaves the treatment room for a few minutes….

And if the dentist’s patient is known to the hygienist it also allows opportunity for the hygienist to “acknowledge” the doctor’s patient…

In all cases the personable arrival of the hygienist is a positive interruption for the practice…with a positive result.

This is because it also allows us to expose and show off our air of kindness atmosphere and culture, in the way that we herald and announce this minor interruption to the doctor.

And yes, I’ve seen in some dental offices where the dental software is used to alert the doctor that the hygienist is ready.

I like the idea of this process being discrete, but I also like the idea of announcing that the doctor is needed in the hygiene room being used as a “positive” for the dental office image.

Similarly, using the software and then having the dentist’s dental assistant announce to the doctor that he is needed to do a “hygiene check” is of little value to the practice and will be seen by the patient being treated in the dentist’s chair as an unnecessary and unwanted interruption and delay in the valuable appointment time that that patient is paying for.

Likewise, having someone else in the office enter the doctor’s treatment room and say something along the lines that the dentist is “needed to do a hygiene check” is also inappropriate and somewhat less than professional, in my view.

As I’ve said previously, at my dental office we decided that the best time for the dentist to be summoned to the hygiene room was at the 40-minute mark of the one-hour hygiene appointment. 

This time worked best for both the hygienist as well as for the dentist, and became the “foundation” or the “spine” of the dental appointment book schedule. 

The Dentist’s appointment book was then structured accordingly so that he was able to leave a treated patient, if needed, at this time.

This meant that a little thought then had to go in to the Dentist’s appointment book template, so that the dentist was always able to be available for each hygiene examination. For example, it meant that the doc was never to be doing endo, or anything under rubber dam, during the second half of every hour. 

So here’s what happens:

Firstly, the hygienist notifies her patient that it is now time for the dentist to come and review her findings and “do the examination”, and she will go and get him.

She excuses herself from her hygiene patient, and adds:

“I’ll be back in a moment.”

She leaves her hygiene room and then enters the dentist’s treatment room. 

She knows where to stand, so that her presence is known, and then she starts speaking.

She stands just to the right side of the dentist. 

She has paperwork, including paper notes, that she can show the dentist if need be, without him having to turn or crane.

Her script, when she speaks, is polite and friendly, but more importantly it is purposeful. 

She has a specific message to inform the doctor, as well as a subliminal message for the patient being treated.

She says:

“Excuse me Dr Moffet”.

I say:

“Good morning/ good afternoon/ hello, Emily”

followed by a pause.

Emily then says, 

“I have Mrs. Joan Smith in today [pause].”

Then either:

“She’s a new patient to the practice” 

or 

“She’s in for her regular six-month/three-month hygiene visit”.

By saying this, the hygienist subliminally informs the dentist’s patient being treated that the practice welcomes new patients, or that the practice encourages regular hygiene visits. 

[I was never too concerned with identifying patients as it gave patients a name, and identity, rather than not. The advantages of using a person’s name far outweighed the risk of any privacy breaches… just saying.]

Emily then says, depending, whether Mrs. Smith has anything to be really investigated or not….she will usually say,

“and her teeth and gums are looking very good”,

or  

“there a few areas I need you to look at…”

Emily may even *advertise* some of our services…. 

“She’s interested in Invisalign/ some porcelain veneers…” 

or 

“There are a couple of teeth with large old restorations that I think may require replacement….”

Here Emily may be planting some seeds or confirming some treatment options that the patient with the dentist may also be having, or may be considering.

The dentist then usually replies indicating when and whether he will be down to the hygiene room, and when he does go, there is always a pleasant and friendly apology to the patient being treated.

If he is not able to excuse himself immediately, there is opportunity for the dentist to inform the patient being treated anything from:

“that’s Emily our hygienist, you’ll be seeing her soon, she is so gentle…” 

to 

“Oh Mrs. Brown, she has been coming here every six months for must be about twenty years now….”

I can’t emphasise enough that over all of this is laid an atmosphere of pleasantry, respect for all, and clear and concise communication, so that the interruption to the dentist’s patient being treated is felt as minimally as possible.

And of course, if the dentist’s patient is a regular patient of the dental practice, she will be understanding of this minor interruption because she knows, that this is what happens when she is having a hygiene visit.

Next week we’ll talk about the nuts and bolts and interactions during the “actual” examination process.

*****

Make sure you subscribe to my monthly Dental Water Cooler Podcast Series…. “The Ultimate Patient Experience”

Click on this link for all details

*****

Have you read my book , How To Build The Dental Practice of Your Dreams [Without Killing Yourself!] In Less Than Sixty Days.

You can order your copy here: Click Link To Order

*****

The Ultimate Patient Experience is a simple to build complete Customer Service system in itself that I developed that allowed me to create an extraordinary dental office in an ordinary Sydney suburb. If you’d like to know more, ask me about my free special report.

Email me at david@theupe.com

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